The Uncomplicated Relationship


“Instead, I have calmed and quieted myself, like a weaned child who no longer cries for it’s mother’s milk, yes, like a weaned child is my soul within me.”  —  Psalm 131:2

How often have we been guilty of “fussiness” in our relationship to God? Many times, I have not been like a “weaned child” who rests in the presence of the Lord. I have fretted because I didn’t have my daily devotional instead of being content with being devoted. I have not prayed enough instead of making my life itself a prayer. Too often my deep inward relationship to God is disturbed because I feel I must constantly prove myself to Him.

This is not the rest God promised, nor will it ever be until I learn that a child does not need to earn its mother’s love, or live in the constant fear of losing it. The child finds contentment in the simple relationship itself.

God is concerned with my being, not my doing. God is not as impressed with my regular church attendance as He is with my heart being a continual altar. God wants me to be a light, not strive to shine; to be a disciple, not act like one.

How uncomplicated was Jesus’ relationship with the Father? It was easy, natural. He could make the most striking claim (“I am the light of the world” John 8:12) as naturally as we eat bread and butter. There was no pumped up striving, no anxious grasping. He was–that is all there is to it!

If I am fussy with God, how fussy will I be toward others? My holiness will become prickliness, and others will avoid me like a plague. If my spirituality offends others, it is a sign that I am too self-conscious of it. I should be the last person in the world to know that I am a blessing to others. I must be as Moses, who “did not know that the skin of his face shone because of his speaking with [God]” (Exodus 34:29). Give me that holy indifference to the effects of godliness, which is in itself godliness.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Christian Devotions

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s